Colosseum: Guided Visit for Individuals

Colosseum: Guided Visit for Individuals

Discover the most famous symbol of the city of Rome – the Colosseum!

Up close and personal with the Colosseum

Discover the most famous symbol of the city of Rome – the Colosseum (or Flavian Amphitheater). A most impressive piece of evidence of Ancient Rome, the amphitheater was built to glorify the Roman power and to satisfy the people's appetite for entertainment. Don't visit Rome without admiring this true masterpiece of engineering!

  • Reservations are limited to 13 persons maximum
  • Duration: 45 minutes

Visits in English:
Monday to Sunday: 10:15 am, 11:15 am, 12:30 pm, 3.00 pm, 4:15 pm, 5:15 pm

Visits in Italian:
Monday to Sunday: 12:00 noon
Saturday and Sunday only: 10:40 am, 3:15 pm, 4:45 pm

Visits in Spanish:
Monday to Sunday: 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:45 pm, 2:45 pm, 4:00 pm, 5:00 pm

Cancellation Policy:
Once a confirmation code has been assigned to your reservation, we can refund the cost of unused tickets, also for no shows, minus a service fee (reservation fee and online booking fee).

IMPORTANT NOTE: The time you select on the order form is your preferred time. The museum or attraction will automatically confirm the closest available time, which can be anytime during opening hours on the selected date, if your preferred time is no longer available.

Save time ordering: Add all the service tickets you want into your basket, then fill in the form and send your request.

PLEASE NOTE: Immediately after submitting an order, you will receive an email with your order summary plus a second email confirming your successful payment. A confirmation email with links to the vouchers will be sent one business day after you place your order (Monday afternoon for orders submitted on Friday and during the weekend). Please make sure that your anti-spam filter does not block automatic emails from [email protected]

The Colosseum is probably the most famous monument in the world. With its height of 48 meters (157 feet), the colossal elliptical structure has fascinated humans throughout history. Construction of the Colosseum was begun under Vespasian as a symbol of the grandeur of the Roman Empire. It was inaugurated by Emperor Titus in the year 80 AD.

The popular name of "Colosseum" is due to a statue ("colosso") of Nero once situated next to the arena. The original name of this ancient Roman sports arena, the largest arena of its kind, is “Amphitheatrum Flavium.”

The exterior borrows elements from Greek architecture. Every arch is framed by columns. From the bottom to the top, the columns are Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The attic is decorated with Corinthian pilasters.  Here, small windows once alternated with bronze plaques. Marble and metal were taken from the facade and interior of the Colosseum for use in later buildings.

The design of the Colosseum is a triumph of functional planning. The Colosseum consisted of four floors. It stood 160 feet high with four stories of windows, arches, and columns. It could easily accommodate as many as 50,000 spectators who entered through the 76 gates on the ground level. Two of the entrances were used by Emperor Titus and two for the gladiators. Barrel-vaulted corridors gave access to tiers of seats. The spectators were seated by rank with the topmost seats reserved for women and children.

The basement level, now exposed, was covered with a wooden floor strewn with fine sea sand. The level underneath contained elaborate corridors, service rooms, elevators, gladiatorial barracks, and rooms for wild beasts. During the first ten years of its existence, the stadium was filled with water and used for mock naval battles called Naumachie.

Most shows lasted all day beginning with comedy contests and exotic animal shows in the morning and professional gladiator events in the afternoon.

The Palatine Museum and the Roman Forum
(Please note: your ticket is valid for these sites too, without guided visit)

The Palatine Hill is located between the Roman Forum, the Velabrum and the Circus Maximus. It is one of the seven hills of Rome, and probably the site of the first settlements of the city. The western side of the Palatine Hill is where Roman mythology places the site of the dwelling of Romulus, as well as the cave where Romulus and Remus were raised by the she-wolf.

The Palatine Antiquarium Museum is located on the Palatine Hill, on top of what was once the palace of Domitian. The former Convento della Visitazione was built here in 1868. The museum was set up around 1930 by Alfonso Bartoli. In the beginning, only the first floor was used to exhibit the most important material, including findings from Diocletian's Baths. After WWII, items of greatest artistic importance were relocated to the Museo Nazionale Romano, while the Palatine Museum was dedicated to exhibiting items relating to the topography of the Palatine Hill and its monuments.

The museum was reorganized by the end of the 1960's. After a long closure period and recovery of Diocletian's sculptures, the Palatine Museum reopened to the public showing the artistic culture of the Domus from Augustus to late imperial times.

The Palatine Museum is entirely devoted to ceramics, frescoes, mosaics, inscriptions, sculptures and portrait heads actually found on the hill. Given the lasting importance of this relatively small area of the city, the museum's mere nine rooms offer a remarkably rich and comprehensive tour through ancient Roman history and art.

Full price tickets (valid also for visits to the Palatine Museum and the Roman Forum without a guide)
Reduced and free tickets can only be obtained directly at the museums and monuments in Rome

Technical organization Società Cooperativa Culture - Roma Provided by Società Cooperativa Culture - Roma
Reserve
From 21.00€